Tales from St. Bart’s

A short short for today's WordPress daily prompt. An earlier study in religious culture at St. Bart's, Confirmation, was published in 2015 at Citron Review. Love Thy Neighbor The Alsups file in behind Dan Sloane. Sloane knows it from the smell of Carol Alsup’s perfume. The Mass passes for Sloane in a dreamy reverie of … Continue reading Tales from St. Bart’s

Writing Prompts, Spellcheck, and Academic Advice

There are many, many reasons not to read Flash Fiction Funny while riding public transportation. The first and perhaps best reason is Taylor Mali’s The the Impotence of Proofreading, which will leave you bent over double and wheezing for breath, the workaday passengers all around contemplating the emergency brake at the back of the train. … Continue reading Writing Prompts, Spellcheck, and Academic Advice

The Patron Saint of Juvenile Delinquents

Everyone who's grown up Catholic has a few stories to share, long or short. The good folks at The Citron Review were good enough to publish one of my really short ones: CONFIRMATION Mrs. Dever sees their faces but can’t remember what to call them. They all look alike. They all look bored. They all look … Continue reading The Patron Saint of Juvenile Delinquents

The Halloween Hundred

Dragons Are Dangerous Mulridge interrogated the boy, chilled by his flat voice and steady hands. Twenty years in police psychiatry, he’d never met so cold a child. “You’re a knight?” Mulridge said. “Is that dragon blood on your costume?” “I’m a knight. Knights kill dragons.” “Did you know the dragon you killed was your brother?” … Continue reading The Halloween Hundred

Carnival Fiction

I've got some new short fiction over at Revolution John, a sample from my latest project: church shorts. Who doesn't love the annual church bazaar? Whack-a-Mole Full story 600 words.

Prohibition

The idea is to write a story in 100 words flat. The boys weren’t allowed to have guns.  But they wanted to play gangster, so Howard cut rifles out of cardboard. “We want pistols,” 5-year-old Mickey said. “And Uzis,” said Danny, age 3. Howard, who watched many movies with pistols and Uzis while the boys’ … Continue reading Prohibition